Walking through the fields at twilight

Walking through the fields at twilight 
it's as if this is the only time 
and that daytime and night-time 
are no more than dreams of longing. 
Little has changed since I first went 
walking through the fields at twilight: 
it's as if this is the only time 
and the new house on the hill 
is no more than a dream 
and the spinning of the earth 
is no more than a dream: 
the sun is set, the moon is risen and I'm 
walking through the fields at twilight. 
It's as if this is the only time 
and that I have always been a man 
forever neither young nor old 
and the stones are the same stones 
and the trees I walk under 
have hardly changed since I first went 
walking through the fields at twilight. 
It's as if this is the only time 
and that daytime and night-time 
are no more than dreams of longing. 

(c) Sackerson, 2016
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10 thoughts on “Walking through the fields at twilight

  1. Nice poem, Dominic. The meditations on time remind me of “Four Quartets,” where Eliot speaks of the seamless integration of time past, time present, and time future. Perhaps it’s all a dream. In the larger scheme of things, time is just a handy conceptual tool for humans. I’m inclined to think that past, present, and future are always at play in everything. As Faulkner once said, “the past is never dead; it’s not even past.”

    1. It’s an idea that’s been cropping up quite often for me, recently. I read somewhere that Rudyard Kipling was very keen on the idea that the past was present in the present. I don’t know much about Kipling but it strikes me that the idea can be visionary or reactionary, according to context and how one looks at it! It can either reinforce the idea of how limited human thinking is or be used to reinforce tradition.

  2. Somehow missed this on May 18th. As I read your poem just now, I was hearing music in my mind. It was only afterwards that I noticed Erik Satie and listened to that. Thank you for both.

    1. I’ve been playing Satie’s Pieces Froides on the piano and when I found a Youtube recording of them, thought they’d go well with the poem. Reading your comment got me thinking about what it might be about the music that goes with the poem. The poem talks about time in an unusual way and in Pieces Froides, Satie does without time signatures (4 in a bar, 3 in a bar, etc.) and bar-lines. In a sense, his piece tries to exist “outside musical time”. Obviously, it fails heroically. Like in an episode of Dr Who: the Doctor may travel back and forth in time but we have move forward through it in the conventional manner to follow what is going on (and so does he, if his thoughts are to remain coherent).The third piece recycles the first. It reminds me of Einstein and the idea of time just being a space that we are restricted to moving through in a straight line.

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